World  Business and Economic Analysis 

Iran,

  • Tehran-Copenhagen direct flights launched

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    Iran's Mahan Air airline resumed direct flights between Tehran and Copenhagen after an eight-year halt.

    The direct air route linking Iran and Denmark was inaugurated in a ceremony in Copenhagen Airport on Friday with the managers of Mahan Air and the Iranian ambassador to Denmark as well as Danish officials in attendance.

    In a speech during the ceremony, the Iranian envoy pointed to the growing relations between the two countries in recent months and expressed hope that grounds would be further provided to facilitate travel of citizens from both countries.

    He further pointed to recent reciprocal visits by the Iranian and Danish officials, saying the trips are indicative of the two countries’ determination to deepen bilateral ties.

    Back in January, Denmark’s Foreign Minister Kristian Jensen paid an official visit to Tehran and held talks with senior Iranian officials on ways to promote relations.

    There has been growing enthusiasm for trade ties with Iran after implementation of a final nuclear deal between Iran and P5+1, which took effect on January 16.

    The deal, also known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), has terminated all nuclear-related sanctions on Iran, reopened the doors of foreign investment to the country’s market, and prepared the ground for a much-anticipated economic boom.

  • Tehran, Kuala Lumpur to boost labor ties

     

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    Iranian deputy labor minister has announced the expansion of cooperation between Iran and Malaysia over labor market, employment as well as training for work programs.

    Speaking at a meeting with Malaysian Ambassador to Tehran Raja Nushirwan Zainal Abidin on Tuesday, Iran's Deputy Minister of Cooperatives, Labor, and Social Welfare and Head of Iranian Technical and Vocational Training Organization (ITVTO) Mohammad Amin Sazgarnejad voiced satisfaction towards development of Malaysia as an Islamic country; “especially, Malaysia’s ‘Vision 2020’ is truly appreciable.”

    Sazgarnejad deemed vocational education as a possible venue for cooperation between the two countries expressing hope that bilateral ties will be strengthened in this regard.

    “Numerous Iranian students are studying in Malaysia,” underlined the official emphasizing the need to boost collaboration between the two countries in areas of technical and vocational education.

    He invited the Malaysian ambassador to make a visit to ITVTO in order to become closely familiar with the features and capabilities of the organization.

    Sazgarnejad pointed out that Iran hold good cooperation with different countries in the field of technical and vocational training, including Western countries, East Asian states, Japan, South Korea and India.

    Iran’s deputy labor minister went on to enumerated several other venues for cooperation between the two sides in areas of vocational training concluding “in view of Iran’s condition in the post sanction era, creation of a specialized training center with the participation of Malaysian oil and gas companies in Iran to provide training to oil industry workers can bring about positive outcomes in the ties between the two countries.”

    Malaysian Ambassador to Tehran Raja Nushirwan Zainal Abidin, for his part, said “Iranians have had an active role in technical cooperation in Malaysia since 1981.”

    He underlined that much work has been done between the two sides; “we have tried to invite academic people to conduct cooperation between Iran and Malaysia and we are eager to hold joint sessions with the presence of Iranian academic, technical and professional figures.”

    He further reported on the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the Iranian and Malaysian governments on human resource development concluding “in line with the inked MoU, we can run collaborations in the field of technical and vocational education.

     

  • Tehran, Seoul to Discuss Joint Fish Farming Venture

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    After JCPOA and Iran's deal with 5+1 ,many delegations from around the world flock  to Iran to grab opportunities.
    Based on Report ,South Korea and Iran are set to begin discussions on boosting bilateral cooperation in the fisheries sector that will include a joint fish farming venture, the Seoul government.
    The talks will be held in Iran from Thursday involving officials from South Korea’s Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries and their Iranian counterparts, South Korea’s largest news agency Yonhap reported.
    The two sides will discuss follow-up measures for a memorandum of understanding for cooperation in the fisheries area signed in May during South Korean President Park Geun-hye’s visit to Iran.
    The visiting officials from the South Korean ministry will also check the feasibility of a joint venture in fish farming.
    Iran is already the largest fish farming nation in the Middle East, annually producing some 325,000 tons of fishery products through farming, the ministry said in a press release.
    South Korea is the world’s seventh-largest fish farmer.
    In 2015, Iran purchased 155,000 tons of fishery products, worth $21 million, from South Korea.
    “A joint venture in the Iranian market will not only provide an opportunity for our fish farming industry to leap forward, but it may also help create a Korean wave of fishery products in Iran,” the ministry said.

  • Tehran, Tokyo open new chapter in new water agreement

     

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    Iran and Japan have signed a cooperation document on capacity development for integrated management of water resources.

    The final technical cooperation document at phase two of the project to develop capacity of integrated management of water resources in Sefidrud basin was sealed and exchanged by advisor to the Iranian Minister of Energy as well as Masahiro Ueki, Senior Representative of Japan International Co-operation Agency (JICA).

    During the signing ceremony, which was attended by JICA experts and Iranian officials, the parties expressed adherence to all provisions of the proposed document emphasizing on joint cooperation for making the objectives operational and for providing required reports during the project.

    The newly-signed document, which is anticipated to become implemented in four years, will pursue the following purposes with active participation of stakeholders from various Iranian provinces:

    1- Transparency of sources and uses of water in Sefidrud catchment area based on natural conditions and terms of utilization of water resource development projects

    2- Strengthening consensus building skills, planning and designing implementation mechanisms in view of the allocation of water to different regions with priorities of drinking water supply, dams, water resource development projects, groundwater, water quality, water conservation and etc.

    3- Decision making and building consensus among various stakeholders on the guidelines provided in the coordinated management of Sefidrud basin water resources.

    4- Prioritizing operational issues and programs agreed upon in the catchment area.

    Accordingly, the JICA expert delegation, during their stay in Iran, held variousl technical meetings at department and office levels and, while visiting water resources in numerous Iranian provinces located in Sefidrud basin, launched similar meetings with provincial stakeholders aiming to attract opinions as well as to encourage their active participation during the project execution.

  • Tehran, Tunis discuss energy ties

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    Iran's Energy Minister Hamid Chitchian and his Tunisian counterpart Mongi Marzouk on Saturday discussed expansion of mutual cooperation between the two countries in the energy sector.

    In a meeting in Tehran, Chitchian and Marzouk exchanged views on key aspects of Iranian-Tunisian cooperation and explored potential capacities and needs of the two sides in the energy sector, Tasnim News Agency reported.

    The Iranian minister described the meeting as a major step forward for the two countries to boost energy cooperation and meet each other's needs.

    Heading a high-ranking delegation, Marzouk arrived in Tehran earlier on Saturday.

    Iran's capabilities in the electricity industry will be presented to the Tunisian minister during his stay, Chitchian further said.

    Homayoun Haeri, the managing director of Iranian Energy Ministry's Water and Energy Industries and Exports Support Center, said Tunisia is a new destination for Iran's electricity industry exports.

    He added that Iran will increase export of technical and engineering services to Tunisia.

    The Tunisian minister's visit comes against the backdrop of a new wave of interest in ties with Iran after Tehran and the P5+1 (Russia, China, the US, Britain, France and Germany) reached a conclusion on the text of a comprehensive 159-page deal on Tehran's nuclear program on July 14, 2015 and started implementing it on January 16.

    The comprehensive nuclear deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), terminated all nuclear-related sanctions on Iran.

  • Tehran, Tunis discuss energy ties

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    Iran's Energy Minister Hamid Chitchian and his Tunisian counterpart Mongi Marzouk on Saturday discussed expansion of mutual cooperation between the two countries in the energy sector.

    In a meeting in Tehran, Chitchian and Marzouk exchanged views on key aspects of Iranian-Tunisian cooperation and explored potential capacities and needs of the two sides in the energy sector, Tasnim News Agency reported.

    The Iranian minister described the meeting as a major step forward for the two countries to boost energy cooperation and meet each other's needs.

    Heading a high-ranking delegation, Marzouk arrived in Tehran earlier on Saturday.

    Iran's capabilities in the electricity industry will be presented to the Tunisian minister during his stay, Chitchian further said.

    Homayoun Haeri, the managing director of Iranian Energy Ministry's Water and Energy Industries and Exports Support Center, said Tunisia is a new destination for Iran's electricity industry exports.

    He added that Iran will increase export of technical and engineering services to Tunisia.

    The Tunisian minister's visit comes against the backdrop of a new wave of interest in ties with Iran after Tehran and the P5+1 (Russia, China, the US, Britain, France and Germany) reached a conclusion on the text of a comprehensive 159-page deal on Tehran's nuclear program on July 14, 2015 and started implementing it on January 16.

    The comprehensive nuclear deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), terminated all nuclear-related sanctions on Iran.

  • The ins and outs of banking in the Middle East

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    As banks in the Middle East cope with the impact of the oil price slump on domestic economies by increasingly looking to new markets – Turkey and Egypt in particular – lenders from countries that had retreated in the aftermath of the global financial crisis are heading back into the region.

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    The Middle Eastern banking sector has been one of the few bright spots in the global banking industry since the onset of the financial crisis. In stark contrast to many Western banks that reported catastrophic losses in 2008 and have spent the subsequent years licking their wounds, Arab banks on the whole escaped relatively unscathed.
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    And so while European and US banks have been battening down the hatches, Arab banks have spent the post-crisis years blazing an expansionary trail in markets across the world.

    Liquidity dries up

    However, the sharp drop in the price of oil over the course of 2015 was keenly felt by the region’s banking industry, especially within the Gulf Co-operation Council (GCC) countries that derive much of their liquidity from oil exports.

    And the likelihood of a quick recovery certainly does not appear to be on the horizon. Rather, there are fears that the lifting of Western sanctions on Iran in January 2016 could compound the existing problem, as the country prepares to pump more oil into the market.

    The global market’s unease was reflected by the fact that on January 18, two days after sanctions on Iran were lifted, oil prices fell to their lowest level since 2003, sinking below $28 a barrel. With the outlook for oil prices remaining subdued, the trend of tightening liquidity within the GCC is expected to continue in 2016.                                            

    “Expenditure cuts, lower growth prospects and tighter liquidity will lead to a significant moderation in credit growth across the Gulf in 2016,” says Alyssa Grzelak, an economist at IHS Global Insight.

    “Lower oil prices have already resulted in a drawdown in government deposits. In the United Arab Emirates and Qatar, for example, government deposits have fallen by a cumulative 10% since the second half of 2014 while Kuwait and Saudi Arabia have seen growth rates fall to near zero.”

    In light of this challenging domestic operating environment, many industry observers are now questioning whether the Gulf banks will finally be forced to curb their trailblazing activities after many of them highlighted international expansion as a key pillar of their growth strategy for 2016 and beyond.

    However, in 2015, the Union of Arab Banks, which represents about 330 banks and financial institutions, warned that falling oil prices could impede Arab banks’ overseas growth. Furthermore, there are concerns that the restricted liquidity will make it easier for foreign players to compete in the home markets where Arab banks are already under pressure.

    Foreign banks move in

    Foreign banks are regaining lost ground in the GCC’s financial sector, with Japanese, French and US banks looking to ramp up business in the region as the oil price slump compels Gulf lenders to halt the flow of their trademark cheap loans.

    “The drop in oil prices has accelerated what will be a long-term trend of Asian banks building up their presence in the Gulf,” says Ms Grzelak.

    “Over the longer term, Chinese banks are likely to build their presence in the Gulf to capitalise on growing trade links. So far, ample liquidity among Japanese banks has allowed them to fill the void created by tighter liquidity within the Gulf and the recent pull-back of European banks.”

    Flush with the proceeds of their government’s ‘Abenomics’ quantitative easing programme, Japan’s megabanks Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group (MUFG), Mizuho Financial Group and Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group (SMFG) are making a noticeably strong comeback in the market. MUFG and SMFG secured second and third spots in the year to November 30, 2015 league table for Gulf syndicated lending, according to Thomson Reuters data.

    By contrast, only one regional bank – Saudi Arabia’s Riyad Bank – has a top-six slot, down from fourth in 2014, while Samba Financial Group, also from Saudi Arabia, slipped to 23rd position from second in 2014.

    The total value of project contracts to be awarded in the GCC in 2016 is expected to reach $140bn this year, according to a report by MEED Projects. “Despite the drop in oil prices, the region still needs to build lots of infrastructure and is continuing to invest in it. The past four to five months have proved to be our busiest period in the region for a long time,” says Elyas AlGaseer, managing director, deputy head of Middle East, at MUFG.

    “Our bank has been taking a lead role in major regional transactions. Project finance and infrastructure will comprise our core projects but we are also looking to get involved in structured financing with regards to telecoms, transportation, oil and gas, and industry. And we are now seriously considering establishing public-private partnerships with GCC governments,” adds Mr AlGaseer.

    “The massive contraction in liquidity over the past year has made it apparent that the Gulf banks that will continue to expand – both inside and outside the region – are those that have a clear strategy and deep pockets.”

    Strategically positioned

    Indeed, the National Bank of Abu Dhabi (NBAD) is a good example of that. Cognisant of the tightened liquidity, the bank has strategically positioned the duration of its balance sheet to be short term. It finished 2015 with an advances/deposits ratio of 88% versus the market benchmark of 101% and so has the ability to fund further growth.

    Moreover, as one of the region’s largest banks with assets of Dh406.6bn ($110.7bn) at the end of 2015, NBAD has generated headlines for crafting an ambitious five-year international expansion plan, conceived by Alex Thursby, who was appointed group chief executive of the bank in July 2013. NBAD is half-way through this expansion plan. The bank is targeting specific client segments and focusing on strengthening its dominant position in the UAE while also building its wholesale and wealth network across the “west-east corridor”, which NBAD defines as the region from west Africa to east Asia.

    “Notwithstanding the plan that we have got, a lot of the focus will come back to the home market this year,” says James Burdett, group chief financial officer of NBAD. “With a growing pressure on banks’ liquidity, there may be good opportunities for us to lend in the marketplace to our traditional client base. So my sense is that we will be more UAE and Gulf focused this year and less about the international scene.”

    That said, international expansion will continue to play an important role. NBAD currently generates 21% of its revenues from its international operations, which grew at 11% in 2015 compared with a slight reduction (-1%) for its domestic operations. It predicts that its international operations will continue to grow at a faster rate than its domestic business – albeit from a lower base.

    Crucial to the plan is the development of eight markets focused on providing wholesale products and an international network proposition, targeting approximately 600 clients within five specific sectors across its wholesale business. It is also planning to target what it terms ‘franchise countries’.

    “If we take a long strategic timeframe, the UAE can only take us so far because the market is the market size, capped by its gross domestic product,” says Mr Burdett. “So we believe that at some point in the future, we need up to five what we are terming franchise countries. We have not selected them yet but the first one is likely to be Egypt, which will be a full franchise country that will be retail, commercial and wholesale with a big branch platform and a country that we are looking to accelerate growth in.”  

    Egypt's potential

    NBAD already has a substantial retail banking franchise in Egypt, but Mr Burdett says the bank is confident that the country still holds a lot of opportunity and economic upsides for the bank. “We have been there for a number of years and we are still relatively small compared with the big players so we think there is room to grow. There are a lot of trade flows between Egypt and the UAE and a lot of Egyptian expatriates in the UAE and vice versa, so we think there is a good opportunity for us to make significant inroads there,” he says.

    Dubai-based Emirates NBD also views Egypt as a key market for its future growth after buying the Egyptian subsidiary of BNP Paribas for $500m in December 2012. “Following the successful rebranding and integration of the Egyptian business onto the Emirates NBD platform, the focus is now on expanding high-value customer segments,” says Shayne Nelson, group chief executive of Emirates NBD.

    “We will also pursue growth in our current international markets by focusing on cross-border trade and other opportunities. In the short term we will continue to develop our footprint with more cross-selling in our core markets, namely the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Egypt.”

    Another key regional player that has strong confidence in Egypt’s future is Lebanon’s Bank Audi, which also already has a strong foothold in the market. It also ranked as the bank’s most profitable overseas operation in 2015, recording a net profit after provisions and taxes of $69.5m in 2015, which equates to a 21% increase over the $57.6m recorded in 2014. The profit increase is even more impressive given it factors in the 10% depreciation of the Egyptian pound. Meanwhile, its total revenues in Egypt grew by 36% over the course of 2015.

    However, Egypt’s contribution to Bank Audi’s group performance remains small – representing about 12% of the bank’s consolidated assets. “We have a strong appetite for growth in Egypt that has been confirmed in a revised business plan that was submitted to the board in the last quarter of 2015, supported by our recent very good financial performance,” says Dr Freddie Baz, group strategy director at Bank Audi.

    “Certainly, Egypt suffered economically as a result of the successive political transitions it went through, but it has proved to be much more resilient than many other Arab countries in transition and the economy never fell into recession. We are now planning to recruit high-skilled staff and further invest in new business lines there.”

    Bank Audi Egypt plans to add 20 branches in Egypt in the coming three years, building on its existing 34. It is also considering large funding opportunities worth more than E£11bn ($1.4bn) in various economic sectors throughout 2016.

    Banking on Turkey

    Along with Egypt, Bank Audi is betting big on the untapped potential of Turkey. “We are aiming to add 60% to 70% more assets in both Egypt and Turkey over the next four to five years,” says Mr Baz. “These two countries are our two main development pillars after our home market of Lebanon and we are hoping to achieve targeted market shares in both these countries.”

    Bank Audi has already enjoyed considerable growth in Turkey through Odeabank, its fully owned Turkish subsidiary, which began trading in November 2012.

    “We are hoping to increase Odeabank’s assets from an existing $10bn to $18bn over a three- to five-year horizon,” says Mr Baz. “We are today the 10th largest bank in Turkey among 30 private banks as ranked by deposits – that is not a bad position to be in after just three years of activity.”

    Another regional heavyweight that is focusing strongly on Turkey is Qatar National Bank (QNB), which signed an agreement in December 2015 with the National Bank of Greece to acquire its 99.81% stake in Finansbank, Turkey’s fifth largest private bank as ranked by total assets, customer deposits and loans. QNB expects to finalise the transaction during the first half of 2016.

    “Turkey, with its significant market size, population, growth track record, strong economic and banking sector prospects and strategic location as a gateway between Europe, Asia and Africa represents a promising market and is therefore of strategic importance to us,” says QNB Group’s executive general manager and chief business officer, Abdulla Mubarak Al-Khalifa.

    “Furthermore, QNB intends to capture a growing share of the increasing trade and investment flows between Turkey’s and QNB’s international footprint. For example, Turkey’s trade with the Middle East and north Africa region has risen nearly tenfold from $5.6bn in 2000 to $52.2bn in 2014,” he adds.

    QNB has been expanding its international operations significantly over the past few years, leading to an increase in loans from 19% in 2013 to 24% in 2015, deposits from 37% to 39% and net profit from 28% to 31% over the same period. It predicts that its international operations will contribute 40% of its net profit by 2017. Its goal is to become a leading bank in the Middle East and Africa region as well as south-east Asia by 2020.

    Therefore, it is clear that the key regional players in the Middle East remain both committed to and bullish on expanding their international footprint. Indeed, the outlook for the Gulf banking sector remains broadly positive, with the consensus among industry analysts being that banks will be able to weather the prevailing oil slump in the near term without experiencing a significant decline in asset quality and profitability.

    “Gulf banking sectors expanded their loan books at a more modest pace over the past three years than was the case leading into the global financial crisis, non-financial corporations have restructured debt taken on during the last oil price boom, banks have built up countercyclical provisions, and macroprudential regulations have been tightened,” says Ms Grzelak at IHS Global Insight. “Overall, Gulf banks are more resilient to the current slump in oil prices.”

    Source:Banker

  • The WBY Discovers the Real Iran ,Japanese pianist feels at home in Iran

     

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    By Sadeq Dehqan and Hamideh Hosseini

    Renowned Japanese pianist Etsuko Hirose, who is in Iran to perform some concerts during Japan Cultural Week (January 22 to 28) has said that she has found commonalities and closeness with Iranian people and is content over such closeness.

    The Japanese pianist, who currently resides in Paris, learned to play piano when she was three years old. She could play Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 26, K537 along with an orchestra.

    Hirose won the first prize for young pianist at the International Competition Frédéric François Chopin in Moscow and third prize in ARD International Music Competition in Munich as well as the first prize in Martha Argerich International Piano Competition in Buenos Aires in 1999.

    She experienced her first orchestra performance with NHK Symphony Orchestra conducted by Charles Dutoit in 2001. She also worked with several world symphonies, namely Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, Argentine National Symphony Orchestra, Basel Symphony Orchestra, Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra, Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra and Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra.



    Excerpts of the interview follow:

     

     How well do you know Iran and its music?

    ETSUKO HIROSE: I am here in Iran for the first time. Although I do not know Persian language and your musical preference, I could have a very close relationship with Iranian people. In addition, music is an international language and is able to link people of different countries and languages. I am content over such closeness with the Iranian people.

     

    How many performances have been arranged for you in Iran? How satisfied are you with your performances?

    Actually, I had two performances for Japan Cultural Week in Tehran and one in Isfahan. In my opinion, the performances were successful and I could communicate with the audience which was clear from their applause and concentration on my works. As you know, performing concert is a mutual program between the performer and audience. Of course, before the concert, I had visited Iran for a short time which helped me a lot in communicating well with the Iranian people.

     

    What are your favorite musical pieces? What is your style in playing piano?

    I have worked on romantic pieces. Two issues are of high significance in my performances: The first is the purpose of the program's producer and the second is the kind of message they can convey. I do my best in playing piano and try to put all my feelings into the performance.

     

    How are the works of Eastern and Western pianists different?

    Many years ago, the difference between Japanese and Western pianists was very palpable. The difference was due to several issues. At present, all musical boundaries are unclear and one might even find a lot of similarities in the music of two cultures.

    As I have learned playing piano in France, my style is inevitably like French pianists.

     

    Please tell us briefly about your performance. On the stage, while you were playing, you breathed deeply at intervals and you also used head and hand movements. Does it have a dramatic aspect or is there any other reason?

    I believe that a music player is like a lecturer with rising and falling tones which are very important for his or her words. Although piano is an instrument, I maintain that the very basis of music is voice. While playing the piano, I try to be like a singer who sings a piece.

     

    How did you select the pieces that you performed in Iran?

    In fact, I intended to show the high capabilities of the piano in performing the pieces using several themes and subjects. Accordingly, I used Beethoven's 'Moonlight' which is about nature and environment. I believe that music is not just to convey human feelings but rather the nature's feeling. I used Mily Balakirev's 'Islamey' out of respect for Islam.

     

    Are you satisfied with your current position in playing the piano?

    I don't think I've achieved the pinnacle of my ability yet. Usually, pianists reach that point in their 40s or 50s. I do my best to develop my performances.

     

    What are your programs after the performance in Iran?

    I will return to France after the concerts in Iran. I will have five concerts in a music festival in France and after that I will go for programs in the US and Japan.

  • This is Iran

    By :Armin Karimi
     
     
     
    حضور گردشگران و مسافران نوروزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه پرندگان آبزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
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    حضور گردشگران و مسافران نوروزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه طاووس ها در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    حضور گردشگران و مسافران نوروزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    حضور گردشگران و مسافران نوروزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه پرندگان زینتی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه پرندگان آبزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه پرندگان زینتی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه پرندگان آبزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه طاووس ها در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه پرندگان آبزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    حضور گردشگران و مسافران نوروزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه پرندگان آبزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    حضور گردشگران و مسافران نوروزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه پرندگان آبزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه شترمرغ ها در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه پرندگان آبزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه پرندگان آبزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    حضور گردشگران و مسافران نوروزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه پرندگان آبزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه شترمرغ ها در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    زیستگاه پرندگان آبزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    حضور گردشگران و مسافران نوروزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    حضور گردشگران و مسافران نوروزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    حضور گردشگران و مسافران نوروزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
     
    حضور گردشگران و مسافران نوروزی در باغ پرندگان تهران
  • This is Iran -Rose water extraction in the City of Qamsar near Kashan

     

    تصاویر: آیین زیبایی گلابگیری
     
    تصاویر: آیین زیبایی گلابگیری
     
    تصاویر: آیین زیبایی گلابگیری
     
    تصاویر: آیین زیبایی گلابگیری
     
    تصاویر: آیین زیبایی گلابگیری
     
    تصاویر: آیین زیبایی گلابگیری
     
    تصاویر: آیین زیبایی گلابگیری
     
    تصاویر: آیین زیبایی گلابگیری
     
    تصاویر: آیین زیبایی گلابگیری
     
    تصاویر: آیین زیبایی گلابگیری
     
    تصاویر: آیین زیبایی گلابگیری
     
    The Festival of Rose and Rosewater is held annually in the second half of May in Kashan.

    Historical monuments and architecture of Kashan add to the popularity of this festival, Iran Review reported

    The season for picking rose and preparing rosewater is from early May to mid-June. In early May, the scent of rose spreads all over Kashan, such as Qamsar, Barzak and Niasar.

    The ceremony for producing rosewater attracts many tourists from different parts of the country and abroad.

     Every day, some 80,000 people visit various cities of Kashan, the hub of Mohammadi Rose in Iran, for this traditional ceremony.

    The arrival of tourists in the districts of Kashan has had a positive impact on the region’s economy.

    Rosewater is made from the sweet-smelling Mohammadi Rose. It is used in various dishes and sweets. It is also used as a perfume by Muslims.

    Although modern factories have been constructed, a large part of rosewater production is carried out traditionally in gardens and homes.
     
  • This is Iran, International Neuroscience Institute Manager , Prof. Madjid Samii

     
     
  • Trade-Industrial free zones in Iran

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    Do you know what trade-Industrial free zones offers incentive to foreigner  in Iran?
    Please download attached files to know more:

  • Turkey Aims to Triple Trade With Iran

     

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    Turkey aims to triple trade with Iran to $30 billion as quickly as possible after the lifting of economic sanctions made banking transactions with the country easier, Turkish Customs and Trade Minister Bulent Tufenkci said in an interview.
    The United States and Europe lifted sanctions on Tehran in January under the deal that limited Iran’s nuclear program. But some restrictions remain, slowing Iranian hopes to reintegrate with world markets.
    “Banking and financial transactions have become easier (for Turkey) after the sanctions on Iran were softened, already boosting our business with Iran,” Tufenkci told Reuters in an interview in Ankara.
    Trade volume between Iran and Turkey rose to $21.9 billion in 2012, then fell below $10 billion in 2015 with the effects of the sanctions.
    The Turkish and Iranian central banks have reopened their connection on the SWIFT global transaction network, an Iranian economy official said earlier this month, in a sign of normalizing banking ties.
    Tufenkci also said Turkey’s targets of increasing its exports to $155.5 billion this year, from $144 billion in 2015, and of reaching 4.5% economic growth were achievable.
    “It was targeting growth of above 5% in 2017,” he said.
    Tufenkci voiced optimism that relations with Russia, which has taken retaliatory economic measures against Turkey after the Turkish military shot down a Russian warplane near the Syrian border last year, would get back on track soon.
    The creation of a “green corridor” between Russia and Iran for exporting Iranian agricultural products to the neighboring country is primarily aimed at substituting sanctioned Turkish products, Russian Deputy Agriculture Minister Sergei Levin said in April.
    “After the adoption by the government of Russia of sanctions on the import of agricultural products from the Republic of Turkey, the country’s [Russia’s] Ministry of Agriculture is actively working on the replacement of these products, first of all, by goods from Iran. It is this, in the first place, that the order to create a ‘green corridor’ is linked to,” Levin was quoted as saying by the press service of Russia’s North Caucasus Republic of Dagestan.
    The corridor will become operational “at full strength” by the end of 2016, he added.

     Turkey to Establish Industrial Park in Iran
    Tehran and Ankara signed a memorandum of understanding late Monday, based on which Turkey is to build an industrial park featuring 140 production units in Iran.
    “The initial capital required for the project is estimated at $10 billion. About 85% of the workforce in this industrial park will be Iranian,” said Mohsen Jalalpour, the head of Iran Chamber of Commerce, Industries, Mining and Agriculture, in a meeting with Erdal Bahcivan, chairman of Istanbul Chamber of Industries in Tehran.
    Deputy minister of industries, mining and trade, Ali Yazdani, who was also present at the meeting, said a Turkish delegation comprising representatives of industrial units will pay a visit to Iran in September to decide on the location of this industrial park, IRNA reported.
    Earlier in April, Yazdani, who also chairs state-run Iran Small Industries and Industrial Parks Organization, visited Bashkent Industrial Town in Ankara at the head of a delegation of the ministry officials and heads of Iranian industrial parks. He met with Turkish deputy minister of science, industry and technology, Ramazan Yildirim.
    The two sides discussed two locations for the joint investment: one in East Azarbaijan Province’s capital city of Tabriz and the other in Urmia, the provincial capital of West Azarbaijan Province.
    According to Yazdani, Turkey is planning to select two of its industrial towns for joint investment with Iran.
    As discussed by the Turkish and Iranian officials, the industrial parks will be used for the production of apparel, leather, gold and jewelry, auto parts and decorative stones.
    Meanwhile, Iran is also in talks with China to establish another industrial park in Bam Special Economic Zone in Kerman Province for the production of auto parts.
    Industrial towns or parks may contain oil refineries, ports, warehouses, distribution centers, chemical plants, plastic manufacturers, airports, food and beverage producers and steel manufacturers, to name a few.
    Some industrial parks offer incentives for businesses to locate there, such as tax exemptions.

  • Turkish $4.2-billion deal to build Iran power plants’

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    Turkish energy company Unit International has reached a deal worth $4.2 billion with Iran’s Energy Ministry to build seven natural gas power plants, in what it said was the biggest investment in Iran since the lifting of sanctions.

    A total of seven power stations, to be built in seven separate regions of Iran, would have a combined installed capacity of 6,020 megawatts, said the company in a statement, as reported by Reuters.

    “Unit International has reached a deal with the Iranian Energy Ministry worth some $4.2 billion to build natural gas combined cycle power plants,” Unit said, adding that the agreement was signed at a ceremony in Tehran on June 1.

    Unit International is owned by Ünal Aysal, the former chairman of major Turkish soccer club Galatasaray.

    Aysal said to reporters that when completed, the power plants would meet 10 percent of Iran’s energy needs. Construction of the seven plants was planned to begin in the first quarter of 2017.

    The company signed a 20-year agreement with Iranian officials to build the power plants on a build-operate-transfer (BOT) model.

    “Over this period, Iran will provide natural gas to us. Iran will also purchase the power that will be generated by us on a pre-defined price for a six-year period. After this, the electricity will be exported by Iran or sold in the country’s free market,” Aysal said, adding that such investments had only been made by Iranian companies up to now.

    “This agreement represents a first in terms of the opening of Iran to foreign direct investment,” he added.


    1,000 hours of negotiations 

    Mohsen Tarztalab, the head of Thermal Power Plant Holding, which is responsible for the deal on behalf of the Iranian Energy Ministry, said the sides negotiated for the deal over more than 1,000 hours in the last 12 months.

    “As the gas-fired power plants have outmoded technologies, their efficiency levels are low. The power plants that will be built by Aysal’s company will be two times more efficient than the existing ones,” he said.

    Iran’s deputy energy minister, Husheng Felahetiyan, told daily Hürriyet last week that the country would soon sign a deal worth around $3 billion with Turkish companies to build power plants with an installed power of 5,000 MW.

    Felahetiyan also noted that the power trade between Iran and Turkey would increase, adding that Iran now sells around 350 MW of electricity to Turkey.

    The United States, the European Union and the United Nations lifted most sanctions on Iran in January under a deal with world powers whereby Tehran agreed to curbs on its nuclear program.

    Turkish companies  have seen Iran as best Investment hub andmove as a major trade and investment opportunity, with the car, clothing, textiles, machinery and chemicals sectors seen as offering particular potential.

     

    Investment Process
     


    Conclusion and call for consultation
    Niroo Research Institute to facilitate investment in the development of CHP generators provides all services to small-scale plants investors with the aim of increasing penetration of combined heat and power generators, increasing efficiency and peak shaving of the Network.
        Issuance Agreement, construction and operation permit, obtaining permits and certificates, contract of guaranteed electric power purchasing.
        Coordinate the activity of attract participation units in regional electric companies and electrical distribution companies.
        Condition assessment tests, performance testing and Maintenance Planning.
    Free consultation services to investors in great Tehran:
        Feasibility consultation, technical-economic evaluation of projects, investment consulting.
        Finding the optimal place for generator installation and heat recovery.
        Introduction of qualified consultants and contractors to design and implementation of CHP units.

  • Turkish Investors to Build 10 Hotels in Iran

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    Investors from Turkey will build at least 10 hotels in Iran, as part of an agreement signed during Turkish Culture and Tourism Minister Mahir Unal’s official visit to Tehran on Thursday.
    The number of flights between the two countries is also set to increase for attracting more Iranian tourists to Turkey, Turkish newspaper Daily Sabah reported on its website.
    Unal met with the head of Iran’s Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts and Tourism Organization, Masoud Soltanifar, while representatives from the Turkish tourism sector met with Iranian counterparts in Tehran to discuss investment and cooperation opportunities.
    The Turkish delegation included representatives from the Association of Turkish Travel Agencies, Turkish Tourism Investors Association, Hotel Association of Turkey and Turkish Hoteliers Federation.
    The hotels are to be built in Tehran, Isfahan, Shiraz, Tabriz and Mashhad.
    “We will transfer our knowhow on training, planning, marketing and advertising to raise tourism standards in Iran,” a Turkish tourism ministry official told Reuters, declining to be identified because he was not authorized to speak to the media.
    Turkey and Iran will also organize joint tours for the Asian market that will include visiting cities in southeast Turkey and Iran, the official said.
    Tourism industry officials expect more than 2 million Iranians to visit Turkey this year, up from 1.7 million last year. In the first four months of 2016, there has been a 7% increase on last year.
    That’s a rare bit of good news for Turkey’s tourism industry, which has seen revenues tumble nearly 17% in the first quarter, hit by a series of militant bombings and worsening of ties with Russia following Turkey’s downing of a Russian fighter jet in November 2015.

      Tehran Confab to Boost Exports to Turkey
    More than 500 Iranian small- and medium-sized enterprises will attend a conference at Tarbiat Modarres University of Tehran on May 26 to discuss ways of promoting Iranian exports to Turkey.
    Secretary-General of Turkish-Iranian Business Council Seyyed Jalal Ebrahimi, chairman of the council, Biligin Aygul, and Iran’s commercial attaché to Turkey, Hamid Zadboom, are among keynote speakers at the conference, which is being organized by Zoodel, online business-to-business marketplace portal for Iranian exporters to neighboring countries, in cooperation with Turkish-Iranian Business Council.
    Annual trade between Iran and Turkey plunged 29% in 2015 to stand at $9.8 billion.

  • Unseen Iran

    The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history

    As the biggest cemetery in the Middle East and one of the biggest in the world, Wadi Al-Salaam (Valley of Peace) is located in the holy city of Najaf, Iraq, and in the proximity of the holy shrine of Imam Ali ibn Abi Talib, the first Shia Imam. The date of burial in the cemetery backs to ancient times and it includes number of prophets, and dutifuls. Primitive grave records bear testimony to how ancient the cemetery is. Annually, the cemetery is visited by millions of Muslims of various parts of the world.

    The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history The most-cherished Wadi Al-Salaam smells history
  • US petchem giant ready to return to Iran

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    A new round of talks between Iran and UOP LLC Petroleum industry company of America has kicked off over investment and supply of new technologies.

    Association of Petrochemical Industry Corporations (APIC) announced that a fresh round of negotiations has begun between Iran’s petrochemical officials and three major American and European petrochemical companies with the main axes of talks being construction of new polymer units, knowledge and technology transfer as well as issuance of license for new petchem plans.

    On the sidelines of K Trade Fair 2016, the world's premier fair for the plastics and rubber industry in Germany, high ranking officials of Iran’s petrochemical industry held meetings with authorities of France’s Total and Air Liquide as well as America’s UOP, formerly known as Universal Oil Products.

    The talks with UOP mainly revolved around supply of modern technologies to petchem industries especially in the field of propylene production, cooperation in methanol-to-olefins (MTO) technology as well as propane dehydrogenation (PDH) as a process step in the production of propylene from propane.

    Presently, 80 per cent of propylene production is directly being converted to polypropylene since a centerpiece of the Sixth National Development Plan has been to uplift production capacity of propylene in order to feed petrochemical complementary industries.

    Development of petrochemical industry in Iran also aims to increase production capacity of propylene and polypropylene to supply feed to petchem plants; accordingly, projects to convert methanol to polypropylene have been put on the agenda.

    In addition to UOP, separate talks were also held with representatives of France’s Total oil company aiming to construct a polyethylene complex with new grades on the basis of modern technologies.

    Undoubtedly, Total has been to most active European company in Iran’s oil, gas and petrochemical industries in the post-JCPOA era.

    Also, Iranian officials at the German exhibition attended a meeting with representatives of Air Liquide Industrial gases company exchanging views on turning methanol to propylene and construction of industrial gases units in petchem industries.

  • Volkswagen to sign deal with Iranian car maker

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  • VP: $20bln Trade in Iran's Electronics Market

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    Iranian Vice-President for Science and Technology Sorena Sattari said  that $20bln  is total worth of electronic goods are traded every year in the country.

    "$20bln worth of electronic goods are traded in Iran's electronics market at present and the Iranians are now in possession of 50 million smart phones now," Sattari said, addressing a forum in Tehran on Monday.

    He  predicted that the Iranian electronics trade market would witness a jump to $80bln of interactions in the next two years.

    Iranians have been frantically buying smartphones, tablets and flat screen TVs in recent years.

    Many world analysts describe Iran as one of the most promising economies of the 21st century – and perhaps the next China, a lion ready to awake.

    The Iranian officials announced in 2015 that over 20 million of Iran's 78 million people are smart phone users.

    Considering the fact that Iran's mobile network's penetration rate is almost 100 percent, mobile phones are the most pervasive media in Iran, they added.

    The officials have predicted that the number of the smart phone users in Iran would reach 40 million in 2016.

  • Welcome to Iran, the best destination for Investment in Petrochemical Industry

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    An Interview with Mohammad Berami
    Managing Director of Siraf Energy

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     





    Mohammad Berami started his petrochemical career with the Iranian National petrochemical company in 1973. During his 43-year tenure in the petrochemical industry, he assumed different responsibilities in Iranian as well as other reputed international companies.
    He served as the Managing Director and Board Member as well as Design and Maintenance Engineer for the Razi, Mobin, Zagros, Shiraz, Siraf and Tabriz petrochemical companies. He also held many respectable positions at several other petrochemical complexes in Iran.
    He holds a degree in electrical engineering from Shiraz University and completed his Master degree in Instruments Engineers from the University of Huddersfield Polytechnic in  UK .
    World Business Year talks to Mohammad Berami, the industry expert with more than 43 years of experience in the petrochemical sector, on investment opportunities and potential challenges for foreign investors in Iran.


    What is your assessment of the investment opportunities in the petrochemical sector in Iran?


    After the lifting of sanctions against the country, many international companies flocked to Iran with the purpose of assessing the potential investment opportunities in the country.  There are many investment opportunities in Iran, but it is the foreign investors who should have the courage to initiate the work. Often, many investors avoid facing the challenges and risks associated with investment in Iran.
    The Basf Company has had a meeting with the Iranian petrochemical company for investment in Assaluyeh.


    Any company that has success stories in petrochemical investment?


    The Razi Petrochemicals is one of the success stories for investment in the petrochemical sector. As matter of fact our expectation is very high. We expected that giant petrochemical companies will come to Iran for investment in new projects.
    Due to the privatization of the state-owned companies, the investment situation in the petrochemical industry has substantially changed. Earlier, the Iranian petrochemical companies had to sell their products to the Ministry of Agriculture. But now everything has been changed with privatization  in favor of private sector.  The petrochemical complexes can sell and export their products to domestic and international market.
    What makes Iran a different destination for investment compared to the other countries?
    There are many advantages of investing in Iran, including highly competitive prices for gas-based raw materials, rich ethane content in the country’s gas reserves, easy access to the ocean for export is main advantage, presence of highly  constructing service engineering  companies, cheap labor force and access to growing international market are big drivers for investors to invest in Iran.


    What challenges do you think investor face with in Iran?


    There is a bureaucratic red tape in Iran’s administration, but Investors should be patient because the government supports creating jobs. Investor should consider investing in other sectors like accommodations, hotels construction, health centers in Energy zones which can bring economic development   . There are  a few hotels but they are not sufficient and need more  investment in Hotel and accommodation sector .


    What is your message to International Investment community?


    Having 43 years of experience in petrochemical industry, has created in-depth knowledge for me on Iran’s petrochemical sector.  I can assure them that there are many people like me who are willing to share their knowledge and experience. We are even ready to tackle obstacle and challenges to pave the way for their investment with peace of mind.  

کتاب عملیات بانکی در عرصه بین الملل -سرفصل ها،ضمائم ،توصیه صاحب‏نظران ارزی و مدیران ارشد بانکی

Investment Consulting &Project Finance

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